If I have made a Will, do I need a Lasting Power of Attorney?

 

Making preparations for the future is an essential part of ensuring that our affairs are in order. Two important legal documents that come to mind when planning for the future are a Will and a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA). While a Will outlines how you want your assets to be distributed after your passing, an LPA grants someone you trust the legal authority to make decisions on your behalf if you were to lose mental capacity.
Many people assume that having a Will is sufficient, and they do not need to worry about an LPA. However, this assumption can be misleading. In reality, having both a Will and an LPA is crucial for comprehensive and effective future planning. Let’s take a closer look at the reasons why.

 

Understanding the Purpose of a Will

A Will is a legal document that outlines your wishes regarding the distribution of your assets after you pass away. It allows you to name beneficiaries, appoint an executor to handle your affairs, and provide instructions for any specific wishes you may have. A Will becomes effective upon your death and is an essential tool for ensuring that your assets are distributed as per your wishes.

 

The Role of a Lasting Power of Attorney

On the other hand, a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) is a legal document that allows you to appoint someone, known as an attorney, to make decisions on your behalf should you become unable to do so yourself. This loss of capacity may be due to factors such as old age, illness, or disability. There are two types of LPAs: one for financial decisions and another for health and welfare decisions.
A financial LPA grants your chosen attorney the authority to handle your financial affairs, such as managing your bank accounts, paying bills, or selling property. A health and welfare LPA allows your attorney to make decisions regarding your medical treatment, care, and living arrangements.

 

Why Both Documents Are Necessary

While a Will is essential for addressing matters after your death, an LPA is designed to address situations where you are still alive but unable to make decisions for yourself. These two legal documents serve different purposes and cover distinct aspects of your life.
Consider a scenario where you become incapacitated due to an accident or illness and are unable to make decisions about your finances or health. In such a situation, having an LPA in place ensures that the person you trust can step in and act on your behalf, making decisions that align with your wishes. Without an LPA, your loved ones may have to go through a lengthy and costly process of applying to the Court of Protection to gain the authority to act on your behalf. This can cause significant delays and may not reflect your preferences.
Furthermore, an LPA can provide peace of mind to both you and your loved ones. By appointing an attorney while you are still capable, you can be confident that there is a designated person who will act in your best interests if the need arises. This can alleviate potential family conflicts and ensure that the decisions made align with your values and beliefs.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, having a Will and a Lasting Power of Attorney are both important components of comprehensive future planning. While a Will outlines your wishes regarding the distribution of your assets after your death, an LPA grants someone you trust the legal authority to make decisions on your behalf should you become unable to do so yourself.
By having both documents in place, you can ensure that your wishes are respected and that someone you trust is empowered to make decisions on your behalf if the need arises. Consult with an attorney or legal professional to understand the specific requirements and considerations for creating a Will and LPA that align with your unique circumstances.